Anna Mimran

As a designer, I enjoy involving myself in projects of all creative disciplines. When approaching any project I find it essential to inform my outcome using knowledge of materials and processes. I aim to guide every process with intent and to try and communicate the nature of a products function in its form. I believe this creates more balanced and purposeful objects.

Through completing my placement at Blond, a multidisciplinary design studio, I gained a breadth of skills in many different areas including branding and visual communication. As a passionate and enthusiastic designer I would love to continue learning and expanding on my skills.

+44 7790 510241

Twenty

Twenty was born out of dissatisfaction with what was available within sustainable fashion. The main problem discovered was that combined materials cannot be recycled since the separation of components is often too time consuming or complex. This inspired exploration into the idea of ‘designing for disassembly’.

To ensure they could be disassembled easily, Twenty frames are split into several components. The frame front is split to facilitate lens replacement. The arms attach to the frame front and hinges using screw and bolts rather than by being fused together to allow the metal and recycled plastic components to remain separate, facilitating their disassembly.

Twenty is a proposed solution to how the designers of today should approach any design process. The frames are made using recycled HDPE, it is highly durable and easily recycled. They were designed to ensure adoptability, the form combines soft curvature with a playful and nostalgic silhouette to create a contemporary yet timeless frame. The frames maintain a utilitarian aesthetic due to the visible screws and bolts. These were necessary to ensure the functionality of the disassembly, simultaneously they appear as design details in order to elevate overall aesthetic, becoming an expressive detail of the frames.

Ritual Union

The ‘melting pot’ is a metaphor used to describe a place where various cultures and ethnicities meet and fuse together, creating something entirely new. Ritual Union was born as a direct response to this modern day phenomenon.

The project places its focus on the lessons religion has taught society over many millennia. The research process sought to find shared practices and rituals across several religions and expose their similarities, whilst reinterpreting them into something that can be shared across communities. The ambition was to create an object that would encourage interaction and provoke discussion.

These ideas were explored through creating a ritual object surrounding the act of breaking bread. For centuries this ceremony has been symbolic of prosperity, sharing and friendship, a sacred act to enjoy together.

The outcome included a board made from maple, a tray from terracotta and a bread knife from stainless steel. The forms, CMF and design language took cues from religious artworks and architecture whilst also using soft forms and a neutral tonal palette to complement a contemporary domestic setting.

This dining set was named ‘companion’, a Latin word which when deconstructed translates to, together and bread, perfectly expressing the intention for this product.

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